Passiflora, A fruit with Passion: Part I

Our passion fruit vine last year.

 

Our passion fruit vine this year.

Passion fruit is an exquisite fruit.  When the fruit is ripe, I just cut it open and scoop out the seeds and pulp with a spoon and eat it all.  Some people don’t like the seeds and go to great lengths to separate them from the pulp.  We really like the seeds. 

The pulp and seeds are so yummy when they're blended into a milkshake.

There are many different varieties of the passion vine (Passiflora).  The variety in the above picture is called “bounty” because it gives a bounty of fruit.  We could barely contain our excitement when we finally had a ripe fruit to taste off our vine.  It was deliciously tart with a hint of a floral flavor. 

This bud will open into a passion flower.

This passion flower will close and a fruit will form. The flower has a lovely smell.

 

The passion flower closes and the fruit will soon form.

 

This is my husband's big hand holding a passion fruit. I'm just sayin'... that's a big passion fruit.

 

This fruit is in a much smaller hand.

 

When the passion fruit is ripe, it will turn purplish and will wrinkle up.

 

It's delicious!

 

There is so much to learn about the gorgeous Passiflora.  It comes in so many varieties.  We’re growing many different kinds of our own and can’t wait to see what they turn into.  

Did you know that the passion fruit acts like a sedative?  We always sleep well after we scoop it onto our vanilla ice cream before bed.  We’ve got lots more to share with you on this amazing plant.  Check back with us for part II on the Passiflora

Come grow with us! 

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6 Responses to “Passiflora, A fruit with Passion: Part I”

  1. Suzanne Pye Says:

    Hi, I have planted my first passion fruit vines, one is a Frederick, I’m not sure of the others. The Frederick has many flowers on it, but none of them seem to be forming fruits …. after flowering the entire bloom is dropping off.
    Is there something else I should be doing?
    Neither of my either two vines are even flowering …
    I’m in southern California – and it has been a particularly cool year here to date….

    • I did some research for you and it seems that a lack of pollination activity (bees) is probably the cause of the blossom drops. Weather could also be the problem if it’s too cold, too hot or too rainy.

      My first passion fruit vine grew big and green the first year but it didn’t flower or fruit. The second year it fruited like crazy… then I pruned it back too much and it died. My friend has let her vine go up high into her trees and her vine has produced endless fruit for her over the past couple of years. She doesn’t do anything for it except pick the fruit off the ground by the bucket load. I’m following her method this year with one of my newly planted vines. I’m going to let it go high up into an oak tree. I do keep the base of my vines mulched really well (not up against the base though) and I toss bunny poop on them a lot.

      I am growing about 10 different types of passiflora this summer that I started from seed last summer. It’s a learning curve for me too.

  2. Suzanne Pye Says:

    Hi, I have planted my first passion fruit vines, one is a Frederick, I’m not sure of the others. The Frederick has many flowers on it, but none of them seem to be forming fruits …. after flowering the entire bloom is dropping off.
    Is there something else I should be doing?
    Neither of my other two vines are even flowering …
    I’m in southern California – and it has been a particularly cool year here to date….

    • The one I have blooms and the bloom falls, forming nothing. Why ?

      I have tons of buds. Could I have too many for the plant to form a fruit ? coboy@mindspring.com

      John Chinn

      • Hi John,
        “They” say that if the flowers aren’t being pollinated, the flowers will drop and not set fruit. I have a passionfruit vine that is newly planted and is doing the same thing… beautiful flowers dropping (and I have honeybees). With that being said, I remember my older passionfruit vine doing the same thing the first year and then exploding with fruit the second year. It was a tough wait though because I wasn’t sure what it was going to do.

        Passionflowers can be hand pollinated with a paint brush.

  3. Tavia Wagner Says:

    I have just got my first Passion Vine, a Lady Margaret. I am trying to learn what parts can be used for what. Seems that you can’t use the leaves, cause it could cause cyanide poisoning? Am I understanding this correctly? So, I can eat the fruit and use the flower for tinctures or teas? Thank you for any help!

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